Hyperscanning series part 4: How to do hyperscanning with trigger forwarding

Hyperscanning series part 4: How to do hyperscanning with trigger forwarding

by Dr. Alex Kreilinger Technical Product Manager (Brain Products) In this hyperscanning series, we first introduced our gold standard solution based on BrainAmps, then a wireless solution using CGX Quick headsets and the StimTrigger, as well as the extremely flexible LSL solution. In this fourth part, we demonstrate another hardware-based option: using the trigger mirror…

Timing Verification - Fig. 1

How to verify timing in your EEG setup

by Dr. Alex Kreilinger Strategic Product Manager (Brain Products) Before starting a study that involves EEG recording, it is always a good idea to make sure the setup, including software and hardware, works as planned to avoid any unwanted surprises once it’s time to analyze the recorded data. Unfortunately, it is not always obvious if…

Hyperscanning series part 3: How to do hyperscanning with LabStreamingLayer (LSL)

by Dr. Alex Kreilinger Strategic Product Manager (Brain Products) In the previous articles of our hyperscanning series, we outlined our gold standard recommendation for hyperscanning with BrainAmps, as well as showed you how to perform hyperscanning wirelessly with CGX Quick headsets and StimTrigger. Part 3 introduces a more general approach, which is based on LabStreamingLayer…

Recording the same example sine wave with different sampling rates (= time resolution) and amplitude resolution. The necessary amount of accuracy depends on the Amplitude, signal-to-noise ratio and frequency of the signal of interest. Please note that the differences depicted here are exaggerated and will be much less noticeable with real data recorded from BrainAmp, actiCHamp, or LiveAmp.

Multicenter studies with different hardware – what to look out for

by Dr. David Schubring Scientific Consultant (Brain Products) Joining different labs to run the same study protocol has many advantages, e.g., including more participants from more diverse demographic and geographic backgrounds, comparing results between labs, benefiting from networking and knowledge transfer between colleagues, and ultimately a better generalizability of the results. On the other hand,…

Hyperscanning with CGX Quick Systems

Hyperscanning series part 2: How to do hyperscanning with CGX Quick Systems

by Eduardo Bellomo, Ph.D. Scientific Consultant (Brain Products) In the first article of the hyperscanning1 series, we discussed our gold-standard recommendations for hyperscanning with BrainAmp, our stationary, lab-based, modular system, which may be used with passive or active gel-based electrode technology. This is a great solution, but have you ever thought about bringing this setup…

Figure 1: Distribution of stimulation points in M1 (panel A) and mPFC (panel B), in the two experimental sessions (PE: blue dots; AE: red dots), represented in the MNI space by using a template cortical surface. Green dots represent the four electrodes surrounding the stimulated area, which were used for the efficiency analysis (see text and figure 6 for details).

Transcranial Evoked Potentials can be reliably recorded with active electrodes

by Marco Mancuso, MD1, Lorenzo Rocchi, MD, PhD 2,3 1Department of Human Neurosciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy 2Department of Clinical and Movement Neurosciences, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom 3Department of Medical Sciences and Public Health, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy Introduction The concurrent use of transcranial…

Hyperscanning with BrainAmps (EEG): This figure demonstrates all the different options for hyperscanning with BrainAmps. Solid images indicate the minimum requirement, whereas transparent images show you optional additions, such as the ControlBox when using active electrodes. Note that PowerPacks can power up to two devices, but cannot be shared between participants. The fiberoptic cables from all the BrainAmps need to be connected to the BUA corresponding to the participant sequence. An optional trigger source is connected to the BUA via the TriggerBox and all triggers and signals are synchronized and saved on one single recording computer in a single file.

Hyperscanning series part 1: How to do hyperscanning with BrainAmps

by Dr. Alex Kreilinger Strategic Product Manager (Brain Products) This first part of the hyperscanning series introduces our current gold standard hardware solution for this application: the BrainAmps. Combining multiple BrainAmps allows using separate ground and reference channels for each participant and provides perfect clock synchronization in a single EEG recording file. Hyperscanning refers to…

Disinfection

Disinfection against SARS-CoV-2

by Dr. Christina Florence Lavallée Strategic Product Manager (Brain Products) Labs, universities and other research facilities are starting to re-open after the coronavirus lockdown, which means that many of you may be able to start recording EEG data once again. In order to support you in keeping yourselves and your participants as safe as possible,…

Alcohol Hangover Impacts Learning and Reward Processing Within the Medial-Frontal Cortex

by Dr. Olave E. Krigolson Centre for Biomedical Research University of Victoria Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8W 2Y2. P.O. Box 1700 STN CSC E-mail address: krigolson[at]uvic.ca Acknowledgement This user research article summarizes our publication “Alcohol Hangover Impacts Learning and Reward Processing Within the Medial-Frontal Cortex”. Howse AD, Hassall CD, Williams CC, Hajcak G, Krigolson OE.…