Recording brain waves in extreme situations: The psychoactivity of ayahuasca

This user research summary is based on the article “Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca“. Ayahuasca is an amerindian psychoactive sacrament used worldwide. Neuroscience studies have shown contradictory results regarding its effects in the brain. Combining EEG, plasma samples and robust statistics, we’ve uncovered biphasic effects in the brain which are related to many psychoactive compounds, not only N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), as previously proposed.

2022-02-18T20:22:10+01:00December 17th, 2015|Categories: 2015, Issue 4/2015, User Research|Tags: , , , , , |

New video publication on infant EEG. “Novel Experimental and Analytical Approach to the Multimodal Neural Decoding of Intent During Social Interaction in Freely-behaving Human Infants”

A research group from University of Houston presented a novel methodology for the neural decoding of intent from freely-behaving infants during unscripted social interaction with an actor. Neural activity was acquired using actiCAP EEG electrodes. Kinematic data was collected with inertial measurement units and supplemented with synchronized video recording.

2022-02-13T12:28:30+01:00December 17th, 2015|Categories: 2015, Issue 4/2015, User Research|Tags: , , , , , |
  • New insights in motor imagery from real-time EEG feedback during concurrent fMRI

New insights in motor imagery from real-time EEG feedback during concurrent fMRI

Motor imagery (MI) combined with neurofeedback has been suggested as a promising rehabilitation approach for paralyzed individuals. EEG based MI feedback is particularly promising for therapeutic applications. Yet whether EEG feedback indeed targets specific sensorimotor activation patterns cannot unambiguously inferred from EEG alone. This article demonstrates that online correction of gradient artifacts and ballistocardiogram artifacts enables reliable MI EEG feedback inside the MRI scanner.

  • Decoding subjective taste categories using multivariate pattern analysis of single-trial EEG

Decoding subjective taste categories using multivariate pattern analysis of single-trial EEG

Compared to other senses, very little is known about taste. In a recent study (Crouzet, S. M., Busch, N. A., & Ohla, K. (2015). Taste quality decoding parallels taste sensations. Current Biology, 25(7), 890-896.), we used mulitvariate pattern analysis of single-trial EEG data to investigate which information about a taste is represented in taste-evoked brain responses.

2022-02-18T20:22:47+01:00July 14th, 2015|Categories: 2015, Issue 2/2015, User Research|Tags: , , |
  • Simultaneous EEG–fMRI at ultra-high field: Artifact prevention and safety assessment

Simultaneous EEG–fMRI at ultra-high field: Artifact prevention and safety assessment

Simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions can offer valuable insights for the non-invasive study of human brain function. Concurrently, the benefits offered by high-field imaging have attracted considerable interest towards simultaneous EEG-fMRI at higher field strengths. Unfortunately, simultaneous acquisitions are subject to problematic interactions that can compromise data quality and subject safety. Reducing noise during acquisition is crucial to improve EEG data quality, especially at higher fields. In this article, we assessed the importance of EEG cable length and geometry on noise sensitivity, at 7T, at the level of transmission between the cap and amplifiers.

2022-02-19T12:26:01+01:00March 31st, 2015|Categories: 2015, Issue 1/2015, User Research|Tags: , , , , |

Integration of concurrent real-time fMRI and EEG data: Self-regulation of human brain activity using simultaneous real-time fMRI and EEG neurofeedback

We integrated concurrent real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) data on commercial MRI and EEG equipment. We also report a proof-of-concept experiment using simultaneous multimodal rtfMRI and EEG neurofeedback (rtfMRI-EEG-nf). With this approach participants receive information about their electrophysiological (EEG) and hemodynamic (BOLD fMRI) activity in real-time, and volitionally regulate their own brain activity.

An introduction to mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI)

Imaging the human brain during active behavior is essential to understand how the brain supports natural cognitive processes that are based on and make use of our physical structure. A new imaging modality, mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI), uses electroencephalography (EEG) synchronized to motion capture and other data streams to investigate brain activity while participants actively move in and interact with their environment.

2022-03-12T13:58:34+01:00December 19th, 2014|Categories: 2014, Issue 4/2014, User Research|Tags: , , , , |
  • Non-invasive brain-machine interfaces to powered exoskeletons for restoration of walking

Non-invasive brain-machine interfaces to powered exoskeletons for restoration of walking

This article reviews research at the University of Houston on the design of non-invasive and reliable brain-machine interface (BMI) systems for the control of powered exoskeletons for restoration and rehabilitation of gait in persons with paraplegia and other forms of paralysis.

2022-03-08T18:05:59+01:00December 19th, 2014|Categories: 2014, Conferences & Events, Issue 4/2014, User Research|Tags: , , , , |

VIGALL 2.0: Analyzing different functional brain states and their regulation during resting states

Vigilance (or brain arousal) strongly influences performance and neurophysiological reactions to stimuli and tasks. Dysregulation of vigilance is an important element in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases. VIGALL 2.0 provides a tool to assess this basic aspect of brain function.

2022-03-12T16:17:19+01:00October 9th, 2014|Categories: 2014, Issue 3/2014, Products & Applications, User Research|Tags: , , |

Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) reveal neural substrates of cognitive flexibility

This user research summary is based on an article published as Rustamov, N., Rodriguez-Raecke, R., Timm, L., Agrawal, D., Dressler, D., Schrader, C., … Kopp, B. (in press). “Attention shifting in Parkinson’s disease: An analysis of behavioral and cortical responses”. Neuropsychology. which was designed to examine persistent (input selection) versus transient (input shifting) mechanisms of attention control in Parkinson’s disease (PD).

2022-03-12T17:40:42+01:00October 9th, 2014|Categories: 2014, Issue 3/2014, User Research|Tags: , , |
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